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Doctors Tell Us that Reach Out and Read Makes a Big Difference

We know that Reach Out and Read is an effective early literacy intervention from our extensive evidence base. Since its foundation, the Reach Out and Read model has been studied by a variety of academic investigators, providing an extensive body of peer-reviewed research on the effects of the program.  This shows that parents served by Reach Out and Read are up to four times more likely to read aloud to their children. Also, children served by Reach Out and Read score three to six months ahead of their non-Reach Out and Read peers on pre-school vocabulary tests.

Doctors Tell Us that Reach Out and Read Makes a Big Difference This analytical approach is compelling, but we also hear about how Reach Out and Read affects children's lives from the stories that our medical providers tell us. At the cutting edge of the program, they are able to put a human face on the Reach Out and Read story.

They see how excited infants and toddlers are to receive new books, especially in the low-income communities that Reach Out and Read often serves….

"I still am surprised when a family responds with "We don't have any books"! It is wonderful to see the smiles on the child's face when they take home their very own book!"

"The parents and children look forward to receiving books at their checkups. The children are eager to read out loud and look at the pictures. Sometimes this is the first and only time a child will receive a book."

"One little patient of mine had parents in the Military, who were going to be relocated across the country. His Mother told me that he was allowed to take one suitcase of "important things" - the rest would arrive in a week or two. He filled up half of his suitcase with his Reach Out and Read books!"

…How their guidance encourages parents to read to their children frequently……

 "We had given a book to a 6-month-old infant during the checkup. Mom said they did not have books at home. We talked about the importance of early literacy and a language-rich environment to help develop vocabulary and how it all affects brain development. Mom was very interested in what we talked about. But, when she noticed how intrigued baby was with the book, that was when she smiled and said "Maybe we need to get a couple more books because it seems that he likes them!""

…And, most importantly, how families reading together supports the healthy development of children in their care….

"Jayden was a 2-year-old when I first saw him. He was completely attached to his mom, made no eye contact, and spoke absolutely no words other than "mama" and "dada".  His mother was from a low-income background, going through a divorce, and said she could not afford evaluation or speech therapy. I spent about 30 minutes explaining the importance of reading aloud and having fun together. Slowly but surely Jayden showed progress, and at his last visit he came running to me, hugged me and said "Thank you Dr. K--" in a cute but intelligible way. I could understand close to 50% of all that he said, thanks to the Reach Out and Read books that I kept giving him every visit. Yes, books do make a difference, a big difference."

 

Written by Nikki Shearman at 10:45

The Importance of Encouraging Parents to Read Aloud to Their Young Children

There is a well documented and growing achievement gap between children growing up in the United States that starts in early childhood and persists through school and college into adulthood. It has become increasingly important to determine the factors that affect child development, both positively and negatively, so as to identify how we can give every child the opportunity to grow up into well-rounded adults. This is important for the future of our families, our communities and our nation.

Encouraging Parents to Read Aloud to Their Young Children

Advances in neuroscience technology over the last two decades have allowed us to chart human brain development. The evidence is still accumulating, but it is now well established that our brains develop most rapidly during the first few years of life. The brain has reached 95% of its full size by the age of six.1

Areas of the brain associated with specific skills develop sequentially - the sensory pathways develop first, followed by connections that result in language capability, followed by higher cognitive function. What is most significant is that maximal development for all functions occurs during the first five years of life.3

Child development studies have shown that the architecture of the early developing brain is influenced by a child's experience. Nurturing from a loving parent or caregiver stimulates the brain to develop the circuits that provide the foundation for emotional well-being, social competence and cognitive abilities. Conversely, adverse experiences prevent the brain from developing to its full capacity.

The best time to have an impact on children's achievement is during this critical window of early brain development, from birth through five years. And the best way of positively influencing early brain development is to strengthen the capacity of adults to nurture their children. Giving parents guidance about cuddling, talking to, and playing with their infants and toddlers will help them to support their child's development.

So, how do we reach parents of young children with this guidance?

This is where Reach Out and Read comes in! Our program is integrated into the pediatric healthcare system, so that we have repeated and unparalleled access to families with children from birth through five years at well-child checkups. Over 84% of children visit a pediatric healthcare provider during their first year.  By offering guidance about reading aloud to infants and toddlers, as a simple way of encouraging language-rich nurturing, our medical providers can help parents to give their children the best start in life.

1Lenroot, R.K. & Giedd, J.N Brain development in children and adolescents: Insights from anatomical magnetic resonance imaging. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 30 (2006) 718-729 


 

Written by Nikki Shearman at 09:04

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Reach Out and Read National Center
89 South St, Suite 201
Boston, MA 02111