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When a Book is More than the Story Inside

The official definition of a book is "a collection of printed pages bound inside a cover", but we all know that a book is so much more than that. A book can have many different meanings, depending on whose hands are holding it. For some, it is an escape from the humdrum of everyday life, for some, a journey into worlds they would not otherwise experience, and for others, a source of valuable information, ideas and opinions that enrich their lives. 

When a Book is More than the Story Inside

The books that Reach Out and Read doctors and nurses give to a young child at their well-child visit are more than the story inside!  They are a tool used to encourage parents to read aloud regularly to their young children, a means of improving early literacy skills in the communities they serve, a way of leveling the playing fields.

Mounting evidence shows that what happens in infancy and toddlerhood sets the stage for achievement later in life.  Improving literacy skills during a child's first five years, a critical period of brain development, is an effective way of helping all children to enter school with the foundations for success at school and life beyond.

The Reach Out and Read program builds on the unique relationship between parents and medical providers to develop early reading skills in children. At each well-child visit, our doctors and nurses give their young patients a new book to take home, along with age-appropriate guidance to parents about the importance of reading aloud to their infants and toddlers.

In many cases, the book given at a well-child visit is the first book the family has ever owned, and becomes a much-treasured story. One doctor told us:

"We care for many low-income families, and I love bringing a book in for a toddler and watching the parents' reaction to the child's face lighting up when he or she receives the book. By 18 months of age, it's so obvious that the children have been read to on a consistent basis."

By the time a child enters kindergarten, they have a home library of at least 10 books, and parents who read aloud to them to make these books come alive.

 

Written by Nikki Shearman at 10:00

1 Comments :

I am a retired teacher and would like to volunteer at your organization
April 21, 2015 02:04

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Reach Out and Read National Center
89 South St, Suite 201
Boston, MA 02111